Bobby pins, Fort Collins and recession

Number 2  nimbu flickr

flickr nimbus

Bobby pins, part two.  Thanks to catfc a blogger in Fort Collins for offering more information on the “bob” hairstyle and bobby pins.  If you don’t read her blog called lostfortcollins, you should. 

She pointed out a song by Blind Alfred Read.  Reed was very religious, and could be thought of as an early “protest” singer.

He wrote. “Why Do You Bob Your Hair Girls?” that raged against women’s hairstyle fashion of the 1920s.   Here is part of the lyrics from Why do you bob your hair, girls?
You’re doing mighty wrong;
God gave it for a glory
                                               And you should wear it long .
                                              You spoil your lovely hair, girls,
                                              You keep yourself in style;
                                              Before you bob your hair, girls,
                                             Just stop and think a while.

I found another song he wrote in 1929 when the stock market was crashing.  Check this out:

How Can I Poor Man Survive Such Times and Live? Lyrics: 

There once was a time when everything was cheap,
But now prices nearly puts a man to sleep.
When we pay our grocery bill,
We just feel like making our will.

What goes around, comes around?

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4 responses to “Bobby pins, Fort Collins and recession

  1. Woody Woodward

    In trying to think of some halfway intelligent comment, my mind took me immediately to the number one hit song of 1958! It was the finger snappen` tune by the Chordettes, “Bobby Pop”. Come to think of it, it was “Lolly-Pop!” See where halfway intelligence will take you?

  2. wordsbybob

    Bobby Pop?? You are losing it my man. Halfway intelligence is rampant in this old world. Better to be vast than half-vast, right?

  3. Sad truth is that I own the complete works of Alfred…in chronological order. The liner notes describe the How can a poor man song like this:

    For eight verses, the 49-year-old singer and fiddler assails swindling tradesmen, worthless schools, officious revenue officers, false ministers, and fraudulent doctors, the whole rackety demonology of the modern world that stank in the nostrils of an upright rural Southerner.

    I’ll give you a copy when we get together for that coffee.

    And thanks for the nice words on your blog. I get a lot from yours too. I had NO idea where bobby pins came from before you told me.

  4. We really have to find a time to meet for coffee. Either in Loveland when you come through or in FC.